Back from Vancouver

View of Vancouver from the mountaintop

A view of Vancouver, Canada from the top of Mount Grouse. Photos by my wife, Louise Hainline.

I have just returned from Vancouver, Canada, where I attended the Seventh Climate Change Symposium. This is the same forum held in previous years in Reykjavik, Iceland (July 2014), Mauritius (July 2013) and Seattle (July 2012). I attend these conferences for six reasons:

  1. These meetings are limited to a relatively small number of participants (around 250).
  2. The organizers are fabulous at selecting conference locations.
  3. I have found them to be ideal venues for my students to present their work. In Vancouver, Rui Yan Ma, a student in our Honors College, presented our work on tipping points. It was her first conference presentation and she did a great job.
  4. Each conference focuses on the synergy between local efforts to confront climate change and more global actions.
  5. It attracts participants from all over the world that are focused on the local efforts in their respective countries.
  6. Last but not least, it offers an opportunity for the speakers to publish their findings in the organizers’ fully reviewed journal – another vehicle that offers a chance for students to start their career of doing great science focused on climate change.

I have posted the detailed program of every meeting that I have attended and I am doing the same for the Vancouver meeting. It makes the blog a bit longer than usual but it provides a firsthand idea about the content of these meetings.

A wind turbine at the top of the 4,000ft Mount Grouse in Vancouver. The turbine provides a percentage of the city's power. In previous years, the mountain has been covered with approx. 12ft of snow and has been inaccessible until May. This year, it is already open to the public.

A wind turbine at the top of the 4,000ft Mount Grouse in Vancouver. The turbine provides a percentage of the site’s power. In previous years, the mountain has been covered with approx. 12ft of snow and has been inaccessible until May. This year, it is already open to the public.

I come out of each of these meetings with new perspectives on some important global issues, which I then choose to explore further and share here. This Vancouver Symposium is no exception. I continue to look at various countries and factors that will contribute to the success of the upcoming December 2015 Paris meeting. This time I was prompted to add Canada to the list of countries that I want to explore in greater depth prior to the Paris meeting.

Earth Day is next Wednesday (April 22nd). As you may know, I have profiles on both Facebook and Twitter (I hope you’re already following/liking both). For the next two weeks, I’m calling for your messages, comments and pictures. Tweet to me or post on the CCF Facebook about what you’re doing for Earth Day, what the holiday means to you, and/or just your favorite places, plants or animals that make our planet special. I will be looking out for your contributions and will post and link to them here. I look forward to seeing what you send my way!

Here are some ways to celebrate Earth Day, starting this weekend!

In NYC:
Earth Day Initiative New York
Earth Day 5K Walk and Green Tour
NYC Parks Earth Day & Arbor Day Events
Green Festival Expo NYC
Party Earth: Earth Day 2015 in New York

NYCVP: Earth Day in New York City
New Yorkled: Earth Day New York Events – NYC – New York City

Earth Day Events
Earth Day Network’s Green Cities Events
Global Citizen 2015 Earth Day
Envirolink: Earthday
Facebook: One Billion Trees/Seeds Planted – Earth Day, April 22, 2015

The program schedule of theVancouver Seventh International Conference on Climate Change: Impacts and Responses Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change is below:

 
CONFERENCE OPENING: Phillip Kalantzis-Cope, Common Ground Publishing, USA
CONFERENCE WELCOME: Thomas F. Pedersen, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Canada
PLENARY SESSION: Kathryn Harrison, University of British Columbia, Canada
PLENARY SESSION: Alex Clapp, Simon Fraser University, Canada
BREAK AND GARDEN SESSION (Kathryn Harrison Garden Session held in C400. Alex Clapp Garden Session held in C215)

 

11:00-11:45 Talking Circle
C215 Talking Circle: Scientific Evidence & Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems
C225 Talking Circle: 2015 Special Focus: ‘Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change’
C400 Talking Circle: Technical, Political and Social Responses
C485 Talking Circle: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

11:45-12:35 LUNCH

 

12:35-13:50 Parallel Sessions
C215 Governance, Economics, and InequalitiesCalifornia’s Push to Transform to a Low Carbon Society: Is It Doomed by the Booming US Shale Market?
Dr. Nilmini Silva-Send, Energy Policy Initiatives Center, University of San Diego, San Diego, USA
Overview: California’s AB32 to reduce GHGs will “re-make California’s entire energy economy.” Will vast shale oil and gas in the US and perhaps even in California derail this transformation?
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental ChangeCausal Responsibility, Asymmetric Opportunity and Inequality in Anthropogenic Climate Change: A Behavioral Economics Model of Climate Change Negotiations
Dr. Nicholas Alan Seltzer, Department of Political Science, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, USA
Dr. Reuben Kline, Department of Political Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
Overview: We introduce an experimental game that captures the interdependent social dilemma of anthropogenic climate change and its mitigation, and present the results of experiments conducted in the US and China.
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

 

Climate Change Adaptation: How Do We Know We’re Winning?
Dr. John Labadie, Seattle, USA
Overview: Adaptation is a diffuse, complex activity. Evaluation is a useful tool in managing adaptation programs. It adds value to the process. What does “evaluation” look like in the adaptation context?
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

C225 Climate Issues in Agriculture and FarmingThe Investigation of Farmers Adaptive Capacity: A Case Study in the West of Iran
Behrooz Rasekhi, Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Hasan Sedighi, Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, University of Tarbiat Modares, Iran., Tehran, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Mohammad Chizari, Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, University of Tarbiat Modares, Iran., Tehran, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Overview: Adaptive capacity is the ability of individuals and groups to adapt or adjust to ‎climate variability and change and accommodate shock and stress to ‎systems. ‎ ‎
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on HumansTechnological Innovations in the Wake of Climate Change by Farmers in Cameroon
Nkengafah Veronica Fonya, Faculty of Lifelong Education Department of Community Deveopment, Hanseo University, Suwon, South Korea
Overview: Changes in temperature and rainfall have influenced cocoa farmers to adopt new technologies to increase the quantity and quality of cocoa production in Cameroon.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

The Vulnerability of Small-holder Agriculture to Climate Change in Boset Woreda, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
Emebet Bekele, Institute of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Overview: This research paper examined vulnerability of smallholder agriculture to climate change by comparing vulnerability indicators. It also assessed the perceptions of farmers on climate change and adaptation measures.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

C400 Global Tipping PointsPredicting Global Tipping Points
Micha Tomkiewicz, Dept. of Physics, Brooklyn College of CUNY, Brooklyn, USA
Rui Yan Ma, Dept. of Physics, Queens College, Queens College, CUNY, Queens, USA
Overview: The study will focus on our attempts to predict tipping points in the climate system through critical slowdown and increase variability in time series data.
Theme: Scientific EvidencePhenological Mapping for Climate Change Research
Prof. Vit Vozenilek, Dept. of Geoinformatics, Palacky University, Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Dr. Radim Tolasz, Climate Change Department, Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Praha 4 – Komořany, Czech Republic
Dr. Lenka Hajkova, Meteorology and Climatology Division, Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic
Dr. Alena Vondrakova, Dept. of Geoinformatics, Palacky University, Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Ales Vavra, Dept. of Geoinformatics, Palacky University, Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Overview: The authors employed spatial analysis of twenty-year series of phenological observations. They came to the conclusion that there was a shift in the onset of phenological phases in 1991-2010.
Theme: Scientific Evidence

 

Regional Differences of the Dust Events in Mongolia
Amgalan Ganbat, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University of Taiwan, Jhongly, Taiwan
Prof. Gin-Rong Liu, Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan
Overview: We discuss the regional differences in the characteristics of relationships among frequencies of dusty day(sum of dust storm and drifting dust), surface wind and precipitation during 2000-2013 in Mongolia.
Theme: Scientific Evidence

C485 Social ResponsesENGOs, Informal Social Networks, and Mobilizing the Public to Deal with Climate Change
Dr. David B. Tindall, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Georgia Piggot, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: This study examines the social influence of environmental movement members on climate change attitudes in the Canadian general public.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesBlame Canada: Environmental Movements, National Media, and Canada’s Reputation as a Climate Villain
Dr. Mark CJ Stoddart, Department of Sociology, Memorial University, St. John’s, Canada
Jillian Smith, Department of Sociology, Memorial University, St. John’s, Canada
Dr. David B. Tindall, Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: We examine how Canadian national news coverage provided space for environmental organizations to use the 2009 Copenhagen COP-15 meetings to “name and shame” Canada for its poor environmental performance.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Challenges in Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Local Land Use Planning: Evidence from Albay, Philippines
Sining C. Cuevas, School of Geography, Planning, and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Dr. Ann Peterson, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Dr. Tiffany Morrison, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Dr. Catherine Robinson, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Brisbane, Australia
Overview: This study offers empirical evidence on the barriers and opportunities for mainstreaming climate change adaptation into local land use planning in Albay, Philippines.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

Theatre Late Additions 1 (Check board for additions)The Effect of Climate Change on the Occurrence of Pests and Diseases on Potatoes in Benguet Province
Ms. Hilaria Badival, Research, Department of Agriculture-Cordillera Administrative Region, Baguio City, Philippines
Overview: This paper is focused on the effect of climate on the occurrence of pests and diseases in the production of the potato.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesAnalyzing the Mitigation Potential of Climate Change through Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in a Corn Belt Watershed
Mukesh Bhattarai, Environmental Resources and Policy Program, Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC), Carbondale, USA
Overview: The sequestration of carbon through facilitating the retention of the soil’s organic carbon constitutes one of the main possibilities for climate change in mitigating agriculture’s contributions to global warming.
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

 

13:50-14:05 BREAK

 

14:05-15:45 Parallel Sessions
C215 Political ResponsesUrban Climate Action Planning: Demonstration of GHG Mitigation Tool for Analysis of Local Energy and Climate Policies
Elizabeth Johnston, Energy Policy Initiatives Center, University of San Diego, San DIego, USA
Dr. Nilmini Silva-Send, Energy Policy Initiatives Center, University of San Diego, San Diego, USA
Overview: California cities must do their fair share to reduce GHGs from local policies. We will demonstrate our mitigation tool used to help cities analyze local policies.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesThe Implications of a US Border Tax Adjustment on Carbon Intensive Goods for Treaty Formation
Dr. Ross Astoria, Department of Politics, Philosophy, and Law, Kensoah, USA
Overview: This paper consider the best way to design a US border tax adjustment on imported carbon intensive goods so as to facilitate effective treaty formation.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Making Carbon Pricing Work without Global Agreement
Dr. Jane N. O’Sullivan, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Overview: Choice of carbon pricing system is critical to mitigation. International carbon trading presents many barriers to sufficient and equitable change. A consumption-based tax is explained which enables strong unilateral action.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C225 Impacts on Human HealthPlanning for the Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health: A Focus on Cities
Sabrina Dekker, School of Geography, Planning, and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin, Coquitlam, Canada
Overview: The objective of this paper is to determine how cities are planning for the impacts of climate change on human health, especially as they strive to make cities resilient.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on HumansClimate Challenges: Development of Heat Adaptation Strategies for the Elderly
Assoc. Prof. Hans-Peter Hutter, Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Arne Arnberger, Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Brigitte Allex, Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Dr. Renate Eder, Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Franz Kolland, Institute of Sociology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Anna Wanka, Institute of Sociology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Beate Blaettner, Department of Nursing and Health Science, University of Applied Sciences Fulda, Fulda, Germany
Prof. Annette Grewe, Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Fulda, Fulda, Germany
Prof. Michael Kundi, Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria
Dr. Peter Wallner, Medicine and Environmental Protection, Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria
Overview: The STOPHOT-project is the first investigation in Austria to establish a comprehensive knowledge base on heat perception, awareness of heat risks and adaptive/coping behaviors among older adults.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

The Health Impacts of Severe Climate Shocks in Colombia
Mauricio Giovanni Valencia-Amaya, Faculty of Economics, Universidad del Rosario & Universidad de Antioquia, Bogotá D.C., Colombia
Dolores de la Mata, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Overview: This paper studies the link between severe weather shocks in Colombia and municipality-level incidence of dengue and malaria, using a differences-in-differences strategy.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Impact of Climate Change on Seniors’ Health in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Aina Thompson Adeboyejo, Department of Urban and Regional Planning Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology,Ogbomoso Nigeria., Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Aluko Oluwapelumi Esther, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, : Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria
Olamiju John Kehinde, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Overview: This study examines the impact of climate change on seniors’ health in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria. The incidence and variations of climate related diseases were correlated with climatic parameters.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

C485 ColloquiumIdentifying Climate Change Mitigation Pathways in Canada
Catherine Potvin, Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Ashlee Cunsolo-Willox, Nursing, cross-appointed in Indigenous Studies, Cape Breton University, Canada
Lauchlan Fraser, Natural Resource Sciences and Biological Sciences, Thompson Rivers University, Canada
Alain Bourque, Founder and Coordinator of Impacts and Adaptation program, Canada
John Robinson, Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability, and Dept. of Geography Organization, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dr. Stephen Sheppard, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) Dept. of Forest Resources Management/School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Sally Aitken, Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dr Fikret Berkes, Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
Rosine Faucher, Political Science, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Tarah Wright, Environmental Science, Dalhousie University, Truro, Canada
Natalie Richards, Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Laura Cameron, Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Dr. Mark CJ Stoddart, Department of Sociology, Memorial University, St. John’s, Canada
Aerin Jacob, Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
Overview: Visioning, visualization and scenario building has been used in rural/urban settings across Canada, identifying desired technology, policy, community responses to climate change to suggest socially acceptable mitigation pathways.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses
Theatre Featured ColloquiumImpacts of Climate Change on Health: A Growing Challenge for Health Systems
Dr. Tim Takaro, Faculty of Health Science, Simon Fraser University and Climate Change Health Policy Group, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Sarah Henderson, Centres for Disease Control and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Carl Lowenburger, Dept Biological Science, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
Bimal Chhetri, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University and BC Center for Disease Control, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Maya Gislason, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
Stacy Barter, BC Healthy Communities Society, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: This colloquium will describe health system response needed to address the impacts of climate change, including heat-related mortality, infectious diseases and the identification of vulnerable populations.
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

 

15:45-16:45 CONFERENCE RECEPTION

 

Saturday, 11 April

 

8:30-9:00 REGISTRATION DESK OPEN

 

9:00-10:40 Parallel Sessions
Theatre The BC Experience with Climate Change Action
Matt Horne, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Werner Kurz, Canadian Forest Service (Natural Resources Canada), Canada
Suzanne Spence, BC Climate Action Secretariat, Canada
Malcolm Shield, City of Vancouver, Vancouver, Canada
Tom Pedersen, The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: This session will explore several topics and describe successes as well as issues that have arisen after the days of climate action in 2007 and 2008.
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

 

10:40-10:50 Break

 

10:50-12:05 Parallel Sessions
C215 Technical ResponsesUtilization of Natural Gas Capacity in Response to US Clean Power Plan
Kelly Ann Stevens, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, USA
Overview: This study evaluates the factors that have influenced utilization of natural gas power plants in order to make policy recommendations for state-level compliance with the U.S. EPA’s Clean Power Plan.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesImpacts of Sea Level Rise on Wastewater Infrastructure
Dr. Phillip Thompson, Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, Seattle University, Seattle, USA
Overview: This paper discusses mitigation strategies for protecting wastewater infrastructure in Seattle from sea level rise.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Applying the PMBOK Response Planning Standards to Sea-Level Rise in Florida: Risk Mitigation Solutions for Florida Infrastructure
Dr. Maryam Mirhadi Fard, Powell Center for Construction & Environment, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA
Hamed Hakim, Powell Center for Construction & Environment, University of Florida, USA
Prof. Charles J. Kibert, Powell Center for Construction & Environment, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA
Overview: This paper proposes a methodology for assessing both the risks to Florida infrastructure posed by sea level rise and proposed engineering and relocation mitigation strategies.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C225 Infrastructures and SustainabilityImpact of Climate Change on Critical Infrastructure and Security
Dr. Linda Kiltz, School of Public Policy and Administration, Walden University, Silverdale, USA
Overview: This paper analyzes how climate change vulnerability will impact critical infrastructure in the U.S. and how it is linked to security.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on HumansClimate Change Effects on Growth and Development: A Case Study of the East African Region
Douglas Kazibwe, SAGE Africa – Sustainable Community Research Committee, Allied Network for Policy, Research and Actions for Sustainability, Lessebo, Sweden
Overview: What are the responses that are being taken at regional, national and local government levels to ensure sustainable development?
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Biodiversity and Climate Change in Central Africa: Perceptions, Attitudes and Policies
Dr. Trevon Fuller, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
Anthony Trochez, Department of Education, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
Thomas P. Narins, Department of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
Dr. Thomas Smith, Center for Tropical Research, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
Dr. Walter Allen, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA
Overview: This study develops a framework for conserving the biodiversity of the Central African rainforest under climate change that is informed by the socioeconomic constraints of the region.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

C400 Issues in the EnvironmentThe Carbon Capturing Mechanism Using Peat Treatment in Cameron Highland Malaysia
ShunYing Kwang, KC Kwang & Sons Ltd., Cameron Higland, Malaysia
EeFu Kwang, 33, Lorry Store Main Road Kampong Raja, 39010, KC Kwang & Sons Pte Ltd, Cameron Highland, Malaysia
Davis Tee, R&D & HSE, KC Kwang & Sons Pte Ltd, Cameron Highland, Malaysia
Dr. Ching Seong Tan, R&D, K. C Kwang & Sons Pte Ltd & Multimedia University, Cameron Highland, Malaysia
Overview: We aim to reduce CO2 emission and develop best management practices for highland agricultural activities in Cameron Highland Malaysia. We propose to infuse peat treatment into the current land use.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent EcosystemsHow Traveling Athletes Affect the Environment
Adekunle Dosumu, School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, UK
Overview: Running is among the popular sports in the UK. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from travel of participants to running clubs, parks and the gym could have significant environmental impact.
Theme: Scientific Evidence

 

Modeling Greenhouse Gas Emission in Evacuation Traffic: The Case of Hurricane Rita Evacuation in 2005
Dr. Praveen Maghelal, Department of Public Administration, University of North Texas, Denton, USA
Dr. Xiangyu Li, Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, USA
Overview: This is one of first studies that estimates the CO2 emission resulting from mass evacuation during natural disasters.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

C485 Social Responses to Climate ChangePsychological Barriers to Climate Change Mitigation in Canadians: The Importance of Powerlessness, Perceived Risk, Uncertainty, and the Commons Dilemma
Prof. Gary Pickering, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada
Overview: This study establishes the contribution of perceived powerlessness, perceived risk, uncertainty, and the commons dilemma in influencing inaction on climate change in Canadian adults.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesA Web Platform for Capitalizing on High-resolution Projections in Applications on Regional Climate Change Adaptation Planning
Dr. Yingjiu Bai, Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa, Japan
Prof. Ikuyo Kaneko, Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa, Japan
Prof. Hiroaki Nishi, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan
Dr. Hidetaka Sasaki, Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
Dr. Akihiko Murata, Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
Kazuo Kurihara, Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
Dr. Izuru Takayabu, Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
Overview: This methodology could be transferred to developing countries via the Internet.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Increased Temperature Affects Human Skin Cells Increasing Skin Cancer Risk: Increased Temperature Exacerbates UV Mediated Risk of Skin Cancer
Prof. Melanie Ziman, School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
Leslie Calapre, School of Medical Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
Dr. Elin Gray, School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
Dr. Pascal Descargues, Genoskin, Toulouse, France
Overview: Investigation of the effects of increased temperatures and UV exposure on skin cells in vitro and ex vivo show cellular and molecular changes associated with increased risk of skin cancer.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

Theatre WorkshopLocal Government and Transformation to Address Climate Change in British Columbia Communities
Meg Holden, Urban Studies Program and Geography Department, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Ann Dale, School of Environment and Sustainability, Royal Roads, Victoria, Canada
Dr. Stephen Sheppard, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) Dept. of Forest Resources Management/School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. John Robinson, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Alastair Moore, School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester/Royal Roads University, Vancouver, Canada
Eric Brown, Urban Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Mark Stevens, School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: We reflect on policy innovation and action at the local government level in BC communities. Hear case study research on BC community leaders of particular climate change policy and action.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

12:05-12:50 LUNCH

 

12:50-13:35 Parallel Sessions
C400 Featured WorkshopWhat Works in Fostering Behaviour Change on Global Warming? A Synthesis of Social Mobilization Research in British Columbia
Dr. Stephen Sheppard, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) Dept. of Forest Resources Management/School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Deepti Mathew Iype, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP) Department of Forest Resources Management, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: This synthesis will summarize and showcase success stories, lessons learned, and implications revealed by a cluster of Social Mobilization research projects supported by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.
Theme: Scientific Evidence
Theatre Lobby PostersThe Impacts of Climate Change on the Aquatic Ecosystem of Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico
Dr. Marina Herrera-Pantoja, Department of Information Technology, Queretaro Water Commission, Queretaro, Mexico
Overview: A GIS model is used to map stress tolerance levels of Cuatro Cienegas wetlands plants to dryness and wetness conditions simulated for the B1 and A1B future emissions scenarios.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent EcosystemsPredicting Korean Pine Distribution under Climate Change
Ahn Yoonjung, Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
Dong Kun Lee, Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
Ho Gul Kim, Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
Jae Uk Kim, Environmental Information Research, Korea Environment Institute, Seoul, South Korea
Overview: This study analyzed the distribution of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) which is one of major and vulnerable species under climate change in South Korea.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

 

Optimization of a Carbon Footprint Calculator: Regional Energy Use and Offset Considerations
Anna Kelly, School of Public Policy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA
Patrick Kelly, Corvallis, USA
Julian Preciado, Corvallis, USA
Dr. Sally Duncan, Oregon State University Policy Analysis Laboratory, Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA
Dr. Frederick Colwell, Department of Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA
Overview: We present an optimization of a detailed carbon calculator applied at the local level, and connected with local NGOs to establish feasible carbon offsets through energy efficiency and conservation efforts.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

The Number of Storms Modeled as a Poisson Random Variable to Northeast Coast of South America
Prof. Lazaro Nonato Vasconcellos de Andrade, Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra (Department of Earth’s Science)., Universidade do Estado da Bahia – UNEB., Salvador, Brazil
Ronaldo Santos Guedes, Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra (Earth’s Science Department), Universidade do estado da Bahia – UNEB., Salvador, Brazil
Overview: Return periods of continental northwest coast of South America storms were estimated from Poisson processes and extreme value techniques. The hypothesis that storm frequencies are increasing in time is tested.
Theme: Scientific Evidence

 

Lifecycle Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Mining and Milling of Uranium in Saskatchewan
David Parker, Civil & Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada
Overview: This study presents a detailed study of lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions during the uranium mining-milling phase of the nuclear fuel cycle for three paired mine-mill operations in northern Saskatchewan.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Effects of Climate Change Considerations in Environmental Impact Assessment: The Case of British Columbia’s Natural Gas Sector
Lindsay Luke, Department of Geography, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada
Dr. Bram Noble, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada
Overview: This research examines the effects of climate change considerations on the environmental impact assessment process with a focus on British Columbia’s natural gas industry.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Nursing Educators and Climate Change: An Attitudinal Study
Dr. Phyllis Eide, College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, USA
Overview: Incorporating knowledge about climate change’s health impacts into nursing education curricula requires understanding about educators’ attitudes regarding the topic, which will drive decisions as to course content.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

The Soil Profile Temperature under Agricultural and Natural Ecosystems
Dr. Abdirashid Elmi, Environmental Technology Management Department, Kuwait University, Kuwait, Kuwait
Overview: This study attempts to answer the question of whether or not soil temperature changes can be used as a reliable indicator of global climate change under hot and desert ecosystems.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

 

Emergence of No-analog Bioclimates in British Columbia: New Methods for Measuring Analog Goodness-of-fit in Bioclimate Envelope and Species Distribution Modeling
Colin Mahony, Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: We propose a new method for detection of novel bioclimates in climate change projections. Preliminary results indicate emergence of substantially novel climates in coastal British Columbia.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

 

Fracking Field Trips
Matthew Jenkins, Department of Art, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Denver, USA
Overview: This study offers a collection of photographs of field trips to hydraulic fracturing sites in Colorado.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Forest Development and Removal of Environmental Pollutants through Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions
Zahra Zakeralhosseini, Department of Environment, Tehran, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Overview: This is a multi-purpose solution using Multi-Criteria Approach (MCA)to remove environmental pollutants caused by increasing greenhouse gases through NAMAs.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Impacts of Climate and Sea-level Changes on the Mangroves from Brazilian Littoral
Prof. Marcelo Cancela Lisboa Cohen, Institute of Geoscience, Federal University of Pará, Belem, Brazil
Overview: Based on multi-proxy analyses of sediment cores from Brazilian littoral, I identified the impacts of climatic and sea-level changes on mangroves during the last centuries.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

 

Stakeholder Involvement in Understanding the Economic Impacts of Climate Change and Storm Events on Maritime Infrastructure: Rhode Island Pilot Study
Eric Kretsch, Department of Marine Affairs, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, USA
Dr. Austin Becker, Departments of Marine Affairs and Landscape Architecture, University of Rhode Island, USA
Overview: Often it is difficult to understand the impacts of climate change and storm events on the economy. This project attempts to clarify impacts using stakeholder involvement.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Assessing the Impact of Irrigation on Global Warming
Tayler McPeak, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kearney, USA
Vijendra Boken, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kearney, USA
Overview: Irrigation tends to increase the concentration of water vapor, one of the greenhouse gases. This study examines the relationship between irrigated acres, soil moisture, and the temperatures in Nebraska.
Theme: Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems

 

13:35-13:45 BREAK

 

13:45-15:00 Parallel Sessions
C215 Natural Resources and Change ScenariosAnalytical Study of Rate Volume Annual Liquid Water Content: Water in Clouds
Dr. Neamah Mohsen Lafta Al Fatla, Atmospheric Science Department, in Al-Mustansiriyah University, Science College, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad, Iraq
Dr. Layth M.M. Zangana, Department of Social Science, Garmyan University, Iraq
Dr. Basim Ibrahim Al-Temimi Wahab, Atmospheric Science, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Iraq
Overview: Iraq suffers from a severe declining we can call catastrophic in water resources, due to disagreement Share water with the neighboring countries Turkey, Syria and Iran.
Theme: Scientific EvidenceThe Link between Altered Soil Processes Due to Rising Atmospheric CO2 and Global Tree Decline
Barbara Czerniakowski, This research was conducted by the Bioscience Research Division, Department of Primary Industries, Victoria (Australia) where I was a principle researcher investigating causes of Australian native tree decline. At present, an Independent Scientist holding DPI’s research licence to present and to publish the results of this research., Melbourne, Australia
Overview: The proposed influence of rising CO2 on the Australian native tree decline and its potential link with other tree declines will be presented.
Theme: Scientific Evidence

 

The Irreversibility of Sea Level Rise
Kirsten Zickfeld, Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: Sea level will continue to rise even if greenhouse gas emissions will be halted completely. Can artificial removal of carbon dioxide form the atmosphere reverse and stabilize sea level rise?
Theme: Scientific Evidence

C225 Geopolitics and Adaptive MeasuresComparative Study on Municipal Emissions Trading Schemes in Asia: China, India, and Japan
Dr. Kenichi Imai, Research Department, Asian Growth Research Institute, Kitakyushu, Japan
Overview: This paper compares and analyses municipal emissions trading schemes of China, India, and Japan, and their expected impacts on the abatement targets, the abatement costs, and the abatement technologies.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesHow Does Sovereignty of Arctic Russia Canada Reflect Realism Theory?
Miss Fazolatkhon Nasretdinova, American Graduate School in Paris, France, American Graduate School in Paris, France, Massy, France
Overview: In this paper I illustrates how a claim of sovereignty over the Arctic by Russia and Canada can reflect Realism theory?”
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Climate Protection and Adaption: Towards A Natureorientated, Climatefriendly Metropolitan Region 2050
Dr. Kristin Barbey, KIT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Lecturer, Researcher City of Karlsruhe, agency of urban planning, Architect, Karlsruhe, Germany
Overview: This research project develops an integrative concept, which connects spatial strategies climate protection & adaptation and offers an overview about required transforming processes towards a Nature‐orientated, Climate‐friendly Metropolitan Region 2050.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C400 Anthropogenic Factors in Climate ChangeThe Ground-Level Ozone-related Social Welfare Impact of Climate Change
Dr. Jin Huang, Environment and Resources, Abt Associates, Mountain View, USA
Dr. Anna Belova, Environment and Resources Division, Abt Associates Inc., Pittsburgh, USA
Dr. Jonathan Dorn, USA
Dr. Frank Divita, USA
Overview: We estimate the magnitude and composition of social welfare impacts associated with climate-change induced ground-level ozone changes, explicitly taking into account the intervention of existing U.S. air quality standards.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on HumansThe Impact of Urban Areas on Development of Urban Heat Island: The Case of Rawalpindi City in Pakistan
Khuram Shahzad, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan
Dr. Hussain Sajjad, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan
Sadaf Hussain, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan
Rabia Batool, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan
Overview: The study focuses on the development of urban heat islands due to the impact of urban areas. The study is mainly concern to the city of Rawalpindi in Pakistan.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Municipal Solid Waste Management in Greater Jos, Nigeria
Gwom Peter, School of the Built Environment Heriot Watt University Edinburgh United Kingdom, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
Prof. Colin Jones, School of the Built Environment, Heriot -Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
Prof. Adebayo Adeloye, School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
Overview: Municipal solid waste management is an integral system. The current status of Greater Jos has been affected by unfavourable economic, institutional, legislative, technical and operational constraints.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C485 Institutional Responses and StrategiesTeaching Climate Change in a Business School Curriculum: The Case of an Intermediate-level Financial Management Course
Dr. John B. Mitchell, Department of Finance and Law College of Business Administration, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, USA
Overview: A simple method incorporating teaching of climate change in a business curriculum including assignment, grading rubric, and source material links. Project increases student awareness and conformity with climate change science.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesSustainability Education Across the Curriculum: Higher Education Strategies
Dr. Srijana Bajracharya, Health Promotion & Physical Education, Ithaca College, Ithaca, USA
Overview: This proposal describes a process of designing and integrating a course on sustainability theme to satisfy a long term goal of combating overall climate change.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Scientists’ Views and Stands on Global Warming and Climate Change: A Content Analysis of Congressional Testimonies
Dr. Xinsheng Liu, Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy in the Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA
Dr. Arnold Vedlitz, Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy in the Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA
Dr. James W. Stoutenborough, Department of Political Science, Idaho State University, Pocatello, USA
Dr. Scott Robinson, Department of Political Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, USA
Overview: Empirical research of climate scientists’ congressional hearing testimonies shows a clear message that there is a climate change problem, its cause is at least partially anthropogenic, and support for policies.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

Theatre Change AdaptationA Facilitative Tool for Finding Common Ground on Climate Policy in the Face of Uncertainty and Disagreement
April Danae Presler, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, USA
Overview: I discuss testing risk management approaches to discussing climate change and how this enables diverse groups to find common ground on climate policy.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesHousehold Vulnerability to Climate Change Impacts in Eastern Cape, South Africa: Implications of Socio-economic Settings
Dr. Kenneth Nhundu, Risk & Vulnerability Science Centre, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa
Overview: The communities in the rural South Africa are predominantly rural, resource-based and understanding their characteristics will ensure that targeted climate change interventions are localised and target the most vulnerable.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Farmer Perceptions of Climate Change and Responses in Danish Agriculture
Bryndis Woods, Environment and Natural Resources, University of Iceland and Aarhus University, Copenhagen, Denmark
Helle Ørsted Nielsen, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
Dr. Anders Branth Pedersen, Aarhus University, Copenhagen, Denmark
Daði Már Kristófersson, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland
Overview: This paper investigates perceptions of climate change and elicits the importance of such perceptions as a determinant of past crop choice and future willingness to adapt.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

15:00-15:10 BREAK

 

15:10-16:25 Parallel Sessions
C215 The Policies and Politics of Changing ClimatesStructural versus Cultural Influences on National Climate Change Policies
David Goetze, Political Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, USA
Chong Chen, Political Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, USA
Jenna Williams, Political Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, USA
Jessica Andreasen, Political Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, USA
Scott Winslow, Political Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, USA
Overview: In this study, the authors examine and compare cultural and structural influences on climate change policies in Brazil, China, Germany, and the United States.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesMNCs’ Human Rights Responsibility under International Climate Change Governance
Tsung-Sheng Liao, Department of Law, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
Overview: MNCs’ responsibility for human rights infringement under climate change might be the cornerstone to bring MNCs into structures of climate change governance. Also, a new Protocol of MNCs is suggested.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Framing Community Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges and Implication for Physical Planning in Caribbean Small Island Developing States
Dellarue Howard, School of Planning, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
Overview: This is a critique of the conceptual thinking and development of climate change adaptation related policies in the Caribbean and their impact on adaptation outcomes at the community level.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C225 Mitigation and ReparationClimate Reparations and Scientific Uncertainty: The Role of Computational Models in International Climate Change Liability
Georges Alexandre Lenferna, Philosophy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
Overview: This paper examines whether despite scientific uncertainty computational models of climate change can provide sufficient evidence in support of compensation claims by least developed countries harmed by climate change.
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental ChangeSynergy between Population Policy, Climate Adaptation and Mitigation
Dr. Madeline Weld, Population Institute Canada, Ottawa, Canada
Dr. Jane N. O’Sullivan, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Overview: Population growth multiplies the climate challenge. Enhanced support for voluntary family planning could reduce adaptation and mitigation burden by over 40% this century while improving development outcomes.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

Climate Change Governance in Megadiverse Countries: The Case of REDD+ in Latin America
Alicia Guzmán León, Tec de Monterrey, Mexico City, Mexico
Overview: REDD+ is currently implemented in 56 countries. Its effectiveness resides on its capacity to adapt to each context. What are the implications of REDD+ to governance locally, nationally, and globally?
Theme: Special Theme: Whose Climate? Negotiating the Governance of Environmental Change

C400 Impacts on HumansThe Regulatory Uphill Battle of Reducing Ground-Level Ozone in a Changing Climate
Dr. Christian Reuten, Air Quality, RWDI AIR Inc., Calgary, Canada
Dr. Bruce Ainslie, Environment Canada, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Douw G. Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Peter L. Jackson, Natural Resources and Environmental Studies Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, Canada
Dr. Ian McKendry, Department of Geography, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Overview: Future temperature increases in urban centres might increase ground-level ozone concentrations and require additional regulatory reduction efforts.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on HumansEvidences of Climate Change and Residents’ Vulnerability in Lagos Mainland, Nigeria
Dr. Olajoke Abolade, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology,Ogbomoso Nigeria., Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Dr. Folasade Oyenike Adigun,
David Oyinlade Adejumobi, Department of Urban and Regional Planning Faculty of environmental Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Mohammed Hussani, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria, Igbaja, Nigeria
Overview: This paper examines evidences of climate change and residents vulnerability in Lagos Mainland, Nigeria.
Theme: Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans

 

The Distributional and Welfare Effects of the Emission Trading Scheme on Australian Households
Trang Tran, UNE Business School, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
Overview: Effects of emission trading between sectors in Australian economy on price of goods and services, them on distribution and welfare of households. Five simulations of revenue-recycling are examined.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

C485 Climate Change ResponsesA University’s Role in Responding to Climate Change
Nelson Cainghog, Padayon Public Service Office, University of the Philippines, Quezon City, Philippines
Dr. J. Prospero de Vera, Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs, University of the Philippines, Quezon City, Philippines
Overview: Using data from documents, the University of the Philippines’ role in responding to climate change in the Philippines is examined using models of scholarship as discovery, integration, application and teaching.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social ResponsesThe Long Shadow of Disasters: Impacts of Framing Contests on National-Local Power Relations and Decentralized Disaster Governance
Dr. Kristoffer Berse, National College of Public Administration and Governance, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
Dr. J. Prospero de Vera, Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs, University of the Philippines, Quezon City, Philippines
Overview: The paper examines the impacts of national-local power relations and decentralized disaster governance policies on the role of the private sector, international institutions, and civil society in post-disaster policymaking.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

 

Environmental Health Risk Assessment as a Solution to Climate Change “Policymaking Failure”
Dr. Peter Carter, Environmental Health, Climate Emergency Institute, Pender Island, Canada
Overview: A solution to what we term “policymaking failure” is using the IPCC AR5 science in an environmental health risk assessment with recommendations, which is not done by the AR5.
Theme: Technical, Political and Social Responses

Theatre Late Additions 2 (Check board for additions)

 

16:25-16:30 BREAK
16:30-17:00 CONFERENCE CLOSING (Held in the Theatre

About climatechangefork

Micha Tomkiewicz, Ph.D., is a professor of physics in the Department of Physics, Brooklyn College, the City University of New York. He is also a professor of physics and chemistry in the School for Graduate Studies of the City University of New York. In addition, he is the founding-director of the Environmental Studies Program at Brooklyn College as well as director of the Electrochemistry Institute at that same institution.
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3 Responses to Back from Vancouver

  1. dhoha alshalawi says:

    According to C215 Governance, American transformation to shale oil and gas will cause less greenhouse gases emissions. In addition to what Governor Brown stated about keeping California economy going, producing one barrel from shale gas is equivalent to triple barrel of crude oil. However, the cost of shale gas production is about 50-75$ for barrel which 1/3 of that price produce barrel of crude oil. Also, do not forget to take in consideration man-made earthquakes causes by oil and gas drilling.

  2. Aeshah says:

    I go through it and it was interesting schedule . I noticed that most of them have the same theme which focus on human impact and impact on human . They mentioned differ ideas In different continents of the world . From my point of view, we need to have more and more of these conference but in deferent level of education. I mean to start imply this idea among students from deferents ages and schools which will assist them to achieve important goals. Firstly, from humanity side, creating a generation engaging on the issues of the environment by letting them write or do their own researches or papers about this topic and find the right thing to do from their perspective as young students and do like sort of competition among them and rewards the students . Secondly, from academic side, the student will start thinking critically, positively, and reasonably about the way in term to find solutions depending on science so in this way the students might involve more and more in topics related to issues like this and in science in general.

  3. Jack Edelman says:

    Sounds like it was a very interesting conference! Some day I might go to one mtself if it is relatively nearby and I can spare the tome!
    I agree that publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals is an excellent way to stimulate student research! When I was a Ph.D. student in biology in 1986, I published my first paper! The EUPHORIA was unbelievable to me! I was now a published scientist! My paper was on chromosome research, published in Cytobios, from Cambridge, England. The journal is now defunct. But I now have more than 50 published papers to my name! I even wrote a book—-THE NATURAL CLASSROOM—-A Directory of Field Courses, Programs and Expeditions in the Natural Sciences, By Jack R. Edelman—North American Press/Fulcrum Publishing, Golden, Colorado, 1996 (available from Amazon.com).
    So publishing papers is an excellent way to stimulate student research in science (and probably in ANY subject, for that matter)! Publishing a paper to a researcher is like a record artist releasing a new album! EUPHORIA BIG TIME!

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